Parkinson's in the Media

Keeping Parkinson’s Disease a Secret
The New York Times
Doctors and researchers say it’s not uncommon for people with Parkinson’s to conceal their diagnoses, often for years.  But the secrecy is not just stressful to maintain; experts fear that it also may be slowing down the research needed to find new treatments.  More…

Diagnosing Parkinson's in a Phone Call with a Computer
NewScientist
Thousands of people may soon be making a very important three-minute phone call - to a computer.  It could tell them whether or not they have Parkinson's disease.  Technology has long promised a revolution in "smart medicine", allowing painful pokes and prods to be replaced with faster, more accurate and non-invasive ways of diagnosing a range of diseases.  That vision took a big step forward last week, when Max Little of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Media Lab appealed for people worldwide to test a voice-based system he helped develop for diagnosing Parkinson's.  More…

Patient-Derived Stem Cells Could Improve Drug Research for Parkinson's

NIH News (Press Release)
Researchers have taken a step toward personalized medicine for Parkinson's disease, by investigating signs of the disease in patient-derived cells and testing how the cells respond to drug treatments. The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health.    The researchers collected skin cells from patients with genetically inherited forms of Parkinson’s and reprogrammed those cells into neurons. They found that neurons derived from individuals with distinct types of Parkinson's showed common signs of distress and vulnerability — in particular, abnormalities in the cellular energy factories known as mitochondria. At the same time, the cells' responses to different treatments depended on the type of Parkinson's each patient had.  More…

Skin Cells Yield Clues to Parkinson’s Disease
NIH Research Matters blog
Scientists were able to gain new insights into Parkinson’s disease by reprogramming skin cells from patients into neurons. The technology can help researchers understand how the disease develops and which drug treatments might be effective for which patients.  More…

UCB Unveils Neupro Drug in U.S. Market
Pharmaceutical Business Review
UCB has launched Neupro (Rotigotine Transdermal System) in U.S. pharmacies for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS).  Neupro received the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval on 3 April 2012.  UCB CEO Roch Doliveux said the availability of Neupro is an important step forward for US patients living with Parkinson's disease and Restless Legs Syndrome.  More…

Researchers Say Parkinson's Cure May Lie in the Human Nose
USA Today
University of Louisville researchers hoping to find a cure for Parkinson's disease have discovered an unlikely potential treatment — stem cells from the human nose.  Videos from a laboratory at Louisville reveal the promise:  One shows a rat with a brain damaged to mimic Parkinson's continually circling the bottom of a bowl in one direction, unable to do anything else.  Another shows a similar rat injected with nasal stem cells moving normally and trying to climb out.  More…

NIH Director Voices Concerns About Sequestration
Federal News Radio
Members at all levels of the federal government are concerned about the effects potential sequestration could have on various governmental agencies if it goes into effect in January.  Francis Collins, director of National Institutes of Health, told a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee this week that he worries about what cuts may have to be made.  "It's on my mind sometimes at 3 o' clock in the morning," he said.  "It could do serious damage to the progress that we now see in medical research."  More…

 


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