Parkinson's in the Media

Michael J. Fox Looks Past Stem Cells to Internet for Parkinson's Cure
Michael J. Fox, whose turn from Parkinson’s disease patient to scientific crusader made him one of the country’s most visible advocates for stem cell research, now believes the controversial therapy may not ultimately yield a cure for his disease, he told ABC’s Diane Sawyer in an exclusive interview.  More…

Google’s Brin Makes Strides in Hunt for Parkinson’s Cure
Bloomberg
Sergey Brin, the 38-year-old co- founder of Google, is making strides in his quest to find a cure for Parkinson’s, a progressive disease his DNA and family history suggest may afflict him as early as 10 years from now.  The advances are encouraging Pfizer and GlaxoSmithKline to pursue a new class of medicines that may become the first to slow the progress of Parkinson’s disease in a unique collaboration that Brin is funding.  More…     

Gene Predicts Parkinson's Progression
ABC News
[NOTE:  Diane Cook, featured in this article, is PAN’s Colorado State Director]
Not only is there no cure for Parkinson's, but many patients have no way of knowing how quickly their symptoms will progress.  "We all worry about how rapidly we'll lose our abilities," Cook said. "The uncertainty is very frustrating."  A new study from UCLA may help. Researchers have found two variants on a gene already known to be associated with Parkinson's that may be able to predict how quickly patients with the condition will deteriorate. The study found that patients with one particular variant were four times as likely to have rapid decline of motor function. Those patients having both of the variants studied were even more likely to see their disease progress more quickly.  More…

Collaboration Seeks to Find New Uses for Failed Drugs
The Washington Post
The U.S. government is looking for the next AZT, Viagra and thalidomide — substances that washed out as treatments for one disease but later turned out to work well against a totally different ailment.  AZT failed as a cancer drug but became the first antiviral to work against HIV. Viagra didn’t succeed as a treatment for angina but turned out to be great against impotence. Thalidomide, the notorious morning sickness pill that caused thousands of birth defects in Europe, is a treatment for leprosy and multiple myeloma.  More…

Advocates Warn Automatic Cuts Would Hit Medical Research
The Hill
Automatic federal spending cuts set to take effect in January would threaten U.S. leadership in the field of medical research, risk the spread of disease and delay treatments for patients, a report warned.  Advocates with Research!America argued that sacrificing research investments for deficit reduction would also be a bad economic move.  More…

Mayo Clinic Device Helping Some with Parkinson's Walk More Easily
KARE 11 (NBC Affiliate in Minneapolis – St. Paul, Minnesota)
The Mayo Clinic has developed a device that some Parkinson's patients say is helping them walk more easily.  It's essentially a highly adjustable laser light.  Most of us never give turning a corner a second thought, but diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease, it's often the first thing on Doug Merfeld's mind.  Turns cause him to freeze.  He said, "I have a freezing gait so I couldn't even start. I'd just stop couldn't even start."  More…

18th Annual Parkinson's Unity Walk Raises More Than $1.5 Million in Support of Parkinson's Research
Market Watch (Press Release)
The 18th Annual Parkinson's Unity Walk (PUW), held on Saturday, April 28, 2012 in New York City's Central Park, raised more than $1.5 million thus far and united 10,000 walkers, The Parkinson Alliance announced today.  The event, kicked-off by Michael J. Fox, drew a record number of 527 registered teams participating in the PUW's 18 year history to help raise funds for Parkinson's disease (PD) research. The funds raised are distributed evenly among the nation's seven leading Parkinson's foundations, and the PUW will continue to accept contributions for the 2012 event through May 28, 2012.   More…


Back to May 2012 Monthly Message